What people think about Relationship Betrayals.

I often talk about Sabotaging Romantic Relationships and how this affects all involved.

Today I read an article by Dr Dylan Selterman titled 'What Did I Do Wrong? Understanding Relationship Betrayal' and I found it thought-provoking. This article discusses the morality of relationships and betrayals.

Dr Dylan Selterman wrote this paper with Dr Amy Moors and Dr Sena Koleva back in 2018, but it is definitely worth a read if you are wanting to understand more about cheating.

Their research focused on moral judgment, which is what happens when you access a person’s attitudes and behaviours as either right or wrong.

Here is a snippet of their article. To read the full article, please click on the link below.

What Did I Do Wrong? Understanding Relationship Betrayal

Think back to a time when you felt betrayed. What did the person do? Did they confess? How did you feel? Why do you think you felt that way?

In a new paper, my colleagues (Amy Moors and Sena Koleva) and I wanted to figure out some of the reasons why people think that some relationship betrayals are bad. Our research focused on moral judgment, which is what happens when you think that a person’s actions are wrong, and moral reasons, which are the things that explain moral judgment. For example, you may hear a news report about a violent shooting and say that it’s wrong (moral judgment) because people were physically harmed (moral reason). Or you may hear about a politician who secretly helped a foreign adversary and say that’s wrong (moral judgment) because the politician was disloyal to his country (moral reason).

Most people think that sexual infidelity (cheating) is morally wrong. Most people also think that it’s better to confess to your partner after you’ve cheated, or to confess to your friend after hooking up with their ex. Telling the truth is good, and so is resisting the urge to have affairs (if you’ve got a monogamous relationship).

ARTICLE LINK: https://www.luvze.com/what-did-i-do-wrong-understanding-relationship-betrayal/

By Dr Dylan Selterman – University of Maryland